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If we add up the dates from Adam to Abraham, we get about 2,000 years, using the Masoretic Hebrew text of Genesis 5 and 11.3 Whether Christian or secular, most scholars would agree that Abraham lived about 2,000 B. Quite a few people have done this calculation using the Masoretic text (which is what most English translations are based on) and with careful attention to the biblical details, they have arrived at the same time frame of about 6,000 years, or about 4000 B. Two of the most popular, and perhaps best, are a recent work by Dr. The first four in table 2 (bolded) are calculated from the Septuagint, which gives ages for the patriarchs’ firstborn much higher than the Masoretic text or the Samarian Pentateuch (a version of the Old Testament from the Jews in Samaria just before Christ).

Floyd Jones4 and a much earlier book by Archbishop James Ussher5 (1581–1656). The misconception exists that Ussher and Jones were the only ones to arrive at a date of 4000 B. Jones6 lists several chronologists who have undertaken the task of calculating the age of the earth based on the Bible, and their calculations range from 5501 to 3836 B. Because of this, the Septuagint adds in extra time.

And Jean Lamarck also proposed long ages.11 However, the idea of millions of years really took hold in geology when men like Abraham Werner, James Hutton, William Smith, Georges Cuvier, and Charles Lyell used their interpretations of geology as the standard, rather than the Bible.

The question of the age of the earth has produced heated discussions on Internet debate boards, TV, radio, in classrooms, and in many churches, Christian colleges, and seminaries. Let’s give a little history of where these two basic calculations came from and which worldview is more reasonable. Of course, the Bible doesn’t say explicitly anywhere, “The earth is 6,000 years old.” Good thing it doesn’t; otherwise it would be out of date the following year.

But we wouldn’t expect an all-knowing God to make that kind of a mistake. In essence, He gave us a “birth certificate.” For example, using a personal birth certificate, a person can calculate how old he is at any point. Genesis 1 says that the earth was created on the first day of creation ().

This would destroy any evidence of alleged millions of years anyway.

So the rock layers can theoretically represent the evidence of either millions of years or a global flood, but not both.

Under the entry “creation,” Young’s Analytical Concordance of the Bible9 lists William Hales’s accumulation of dates of creation from many cultures, and in most cases Hales says which authority gave the date. Historian Bill Cooper’s research in After the Flood provides intriguing dates from several ancient cultures.10 The first is that of the Anglo-Saxons, whose history has 5,200 years from creation to Christ, according to the Laud and Parker Chronicles. for creation, which is surprisingly close to Ussher and Jones!

Cooper’s research also indicated that Nennius’s record of the ancient British history has 5,228 years from creation to Christ. Even the Mayans had a date for the Flood of 3113 B. This meticulous work of many historians should not be ignored.Though the Samarian and Masoretic texts are much closer, they still have a few differences.See table 3.8 Using data from table 2 (excluding the Septuagint calculations and including Jones and Ussher), the average date of the creation of the earth is 4045 B. This still yields an average of about 6,000 years for the age of the earth.Hutton said: The past history of our globe must be explained by what can be seen to be happening now. Thinking biblically, we can see that the global flood in Genesis 6–8 would wipe away the concept of millions of years, for this Flood would explain massive amounts of fossil layers.Most Christians fail to realize that a global flood could rip up many of the previous rock layers and redeposit them elsewhere, destroying the previous fragile contents.Founded in 2002 by Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman, the Ph ET Interactive Simulations project at the University of Colorado Boulder creates free interactive math and science simulations.

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